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Other tablelands species




Introduction
Availability of these four tablelands species varies and they are often marketed for their general features rather than on a species basis. This applies to flooring in particular (for example New England Beech and Mixed Forest Whites). Distribution varies between the species. The intention of this brochure is to concentrate on their timber properties.
 

New England Blackbutt
(E. campanulata/E. andrewsii)
This is the most commonly available tablelands hardwood and is described in detail in another species brochure. There are a number of other species utilised by the tablelands industry to produce a range of products, and four of these species are described on this species guide. This should not be regarded as an exhaustive list, as minor species such as stringybarks (e.g. red, brown, diehard) and peppermints (particularly narrow-leaved) are also utilised by the timber industry.
 

Messmate Stringybark
Eucalyptus obliqua

The heartwood is a pale brown with only slight variation. The sapwood is a pale yellow and quite distinguishable. The grain is quite course with some interlocking grain and gum vein being common. The heartwood is only moderately durable (Class 3), limiting some exterior applications. Sapwood is susceptible to lyctid borer attack. Applications include general framing, flooring, panelling, joinery and furniture. Shrinkage is about 5.0% radial, 11.0% tangential.
 

Manna Gum
(Ribbon Gum, White Gum)
Eucalyptus viminalis
The heartwood is a pale pink to a pale pinkish brown, with the slightly paler sapwood not being overly distinctive in colour. The texture is medium and even, and grain is variable. The timber is generally difficult to dry without significant degrade. The heartwood is only moderately durable (Class 3), limiting various external structural applications where it is not adequately protected. The timber works well and has been widely used in a variety of applications including, flooring, panelling, tool handles, joinery, domestic structural framing. Shrinkage is about 6% radial, 12% tangential.
 

Brown Barrel
Eucalyptus fastigata
The heartwood is pale brown, the sapwood pale yellow and reasonably easily distinguished. The colours are similar to those of Messmate. The texture is medium and even, with the grain being commonly interlocked. Gum vein is a prevalent feature. The timber is difficult to dry and collapse is common. The timber is only of moderate durability (Class 3), and the sapwood is susceptible to lyctid borer. The timber is used in construction applications (protected), house framing and internal applications. Shrinkage is about 6% radial, 9.5% tangential.
 

Silvertop Stringybark
Eucalyptus laevopinea
The heartwood is pale brown and may have a pinkish tint. The sapwood is often not clearly distinguishable. The texture is medium and even, with the grain usually straight and generally free of gum veins. The timber can be prone to some collapse when drying. The timber is of moderate durability (Class 3), and the sapwood is apparently resistant to lyctid borer. It is similar to Blackbutt in a lot of characteristics and works well. The timber is used in construction, house framing and internal applications. Shrinkage is about 5% radial, 8% tangential.

Related Sections

Applications
  • Domestic decks
  • Expressed hardwood structures
  • Joinery, furniture and fit-out
  • Landscape structures
  • Non-domestic decks
  • Piles, poles and girders
  • Timber flooring

    Designing for:
  • Durability
  • Structural strength