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Other coastal species



Grey box - grain

Grey gum - grain



Red Mahogony - grain



Introduction
The most commonly available hardwood species from the coastal forests of New South Wales are described in individual species guides.

There are however a number of other coastal species that are less commonly available, either because their distribution is more limited to certain regions, or they tend to be marketed as a generic hardwood product. These species are described in this brochure, with a brief note on their distribution as a guide to where sawn product may be sourced locally. Like the brochure on the tablelands species, this is not an exhaustive list.
 

Grey Box
Eucalyptus microcarpa
Eucalyptus moluccana
E. moluccana is found mainly in the central and north coast areas of NSW and into southern and central Queensland. E. microcarpa is found on the western slopes and eastern edge of the western plains of NSW, the adjacent areas of south eastern Queensland and also in central western and northern Victoria.
The heartwood is a pale coloured yellowish brown, with the sapwood being distinctly lighter in colour. The texture is generally fine and even, with the grain having characteristic interlocking. The timber is also generally free of gum vein.
Applications include heavy engineering, marine structures, framework, panelling, cladding, flooring and decking. The heartwood is very durable (Class 1). Shrinkage is about 3.5% radial, 7.5% tangential.
 

Grey Gum
Eucalyptus punctata
Small-fruited Grey Gum
E. propinqua
The distribution of Grey Gums ranges between Jervis Bay in the south of New South Wales up to Maryborough in Queensland. The heartwood is a deep red in colour, with the smaller fruited variety being slightly lighter in colour. The sapwood is distinctly paler in both variants. The heartwood is highly durable (Class 1), which allows a broad range of exterior applications. The timber is close grained with some interlocking, and is very dense. The timber is often marked with grub holes. Sapwood is resistant to lyctid borer attack. Applications include heavy engineering, poles, sleepers, flooring and decking. Shrinkage is about 4.5% radial, 7% tangential.
 

Yellow Stringybark
Eucalyptus muellerana
Yellow Stringybark is found in the coastal plains and adjacent ranges of Victoria and southern New South Wales. The heartwood is yellowish brown with a pinkish tinge. The sapwood is slightly paler. The texture is medium and even, with the grain often being interlocked. The timber resembles Blackbutt in colour and texture. Yellow Stringybark is probably the best of the commercially available stringybarks in terms of properties. The heartwood is durable (Class 2) and the sapwood is not susceptible to Lyctid attack. The timber's working characteristics are good and applications include framing, decking, flooring, sleepers, poles, piles and crossarms. Shrinkage is about 4.5% radial, 7.5% tangential.
 

Red Mahogany
Eucalyptus resinifera
Red Mahogany is found in the coastal forests of the NSW mid north coast and north coast, extending into south east Queensland and further north. The heartwood is dark red, with a distinctly paler sapwood. The texture is medium and even, with the grain slightly interlocked. Pin holes can be a distinctive feature. The heartwood is durable (Class 2) and the sapwood is susceptible to Lyctid attack. Whilst it is a much sought after species for its colour and grain, it is not available in large quantities. The timber's working characteristics are good and applications include framing, decking, flooring, panelling and general construction. Shrinkage is about 4% radial, 6% tangential.
 

Bloodwoods
Corymbia gummifera
Corymbia intermedia
There are number of Bloodwood species found in NSW, but the two most common coastal species are Red Bloodwood (C. gummifera) and Pink Bloodwood (C. intermedia). Red Bloodwood is distributed in the coastal forests from north eastern Victoria to south eastern Queensland. Pink Bloodwood is found from the NSW mid north coast to north Queensland. Bloodwoods are most easily distinguished by their persistent, rough, tessellated bark.

The heartwood of Red Bloodwood is pink to dark red, with a distinctly paler sapwood. The texture is course and the grain is often interlocked. A feature of the timber is the presence of gum veins, which often limits its suitability for sawn timber (gum veins may also open up in drying). However a good piece of sawn Red Bloodwood is prized for its attractive grain. The heartwood is very durable (Class 1) and shrinkage relatively low (about 3% radial, 4% tangential). The sapwood is susceptible to Lyctid attack.
Red Bloodwood is used for sawn timber production if the presence of gum veins is not limiting. Its durability makes it ideal for in ground uses such as posts. Pink Bloodwood is generally not regarded as a commercially valuable species for sawn production but is suitable for posts.
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Related Sections

Applications
  • Domestic decks
  • Expressed hardwood structures
  • Joinery, furniture and fit-out
  • Landscape structures
  • Non-domestic decks
  • Piles, poles and girders
  • Timber flooring

    Designing for:
  • Durability
  • Structural strength